Tato: Experimental Light

South Gallery

March 19 - April 24, 2004

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
9 X 6 1/8 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
9 1/2 X 7 1/4 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
8 7/8 X 7 5/8 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
6 7/8 X 4 1/4 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
8 1/2 X 5 7/8 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
6 X 4 1/8 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
10 1/2 X 8 1/4 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
9 1/8 X 6 1/4 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
9 X 5 7/8 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
6 3/4 X 5 1/8 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
10 5/8 X 7 1/4 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
10 5/8 X 8 1/4 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
10 1/2 X 8 1/4 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Tato Experimental Light Howard Greenberg Gallery 2004

Untitled (abstraction), 1928-29
9 X 6 3/8 inches
Photogram; printed c.1928-29

Press Release

Howard Greenberg Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of the vintage photograms by Tato. A prominent member of the Italian Futurist group, Tato came to be recognized as the leader of Futurist photography early in his career. His photograms from the 1920s are exemplary of his work, presenting a stunning balance of painterly beauty with the abstract ideals of the Futurist movement. Following where cubism left off, Tato and the Futurists were concerned with fully recreating the connection between thought and the visual representation of thought. The Futurists found their calling in advancing abstract thinking by pushing the limits of art and expression. While manifestos and other writings were keystone to this group, the true product of their conceptual ideas was their visual art.