image
In Beyond the Shadows, Judy Glickman Lauder responds to the Holocaust in photographs, depicting the death camps where six million Jews, and millions of others besides, perished during World War II. Her photographs, often deploying the ghostly reversed-out effect of infrared film, are personal and expressive. They serve as contemplative spaces to reflect on the scope and horror of the Holocaust, and upon those who survived, and those who lost their lives.
 
Glickman Lauder's visual response to the sites of the Holocaust, also serves as context for her telling of the story of the Danish Rescue, on its seventy-fifth anniversary, in words and pictures. On October 1, 1943, Hitler ordered the deportation of Denmark's Jews, but, unlike in any other country during World War II, Denmark's  non-Jewish population  managed to save the vast majority of its Jewish population from the hands of the Nazis. Over the days and weeks following the deportation order, an underground network, working in concert with Danes throughout the country, spirited nearly eight thousand people to safety, via small boats to neutral Sweden. The Danish story is told through portraits and stories ofJewish and non-Jewish  survivors, who participated in the dramatic and perilous Rescue.
 
Glickman Lauder's photographs in this volume are introduced by a poetic text, written expressly for the book by the brilliant Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel before his death. His words inspire the book's title:
 
"Shadows, silent: how to speak their unspeakable language? Shadows, black with white smoke. How to tell the story of their life and death to the living, whom the dead imprison? Do not go near them. Here, beyond the shadows, there are other shadows...."
 
 
Beyond the Shadows is being released this week by Aperture Books. For more information about this publication, please visit Aperture's website here
 
Available for pre-order from the gallery