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Mark Cohen

Viewing Room

November 29, 2022 – February 28, 2023

Hole in Shirt, Wilkes-Barre, PA, June 18, 1974  Gelatin silver print; printed c.1974  16 x 20 inches

Hole in Shirt, Wilkes-Barre, PA, June 18, 1974

Gelatin silver print; printed c.1974

16 x 20 inches

Standing on Rope To Boy With His Mouth Open, 1975 Gelatin silver print; printed c.1975 16 x 20 inches

Standing on Rope To Boy With His Mouth Open, 1975
Gelatin silver print; printed c.1975
16 x 20 inches

Boy and Football, 1974 Gelatin silver print; printed later 16 x 20 inches

Boy and Football, 1974
Gelatin silver print; printed later
16 x 20 inches

Upsidedown Girl, 1974 Gelatin silver print; printed c.1974 6 3/4 x 10 inches

Upsidedown Girl, 1974
Gelatin silver print; printed c.1974
6 3/4 x 10 inches

Jump Rope, 1975 Gelatin silver print; printed later 16 x 20 inches

Jump Rope, 1975
Gelatin silver print; printed later
16 x 20 inches

Boy in Yellow Shirt Smoking, Scranton, PA, 1977 Dye transfer print, printed later 16 x 20 inches

Boy in Yellow Shirt Smoking, Scranton, PA, 1977
Dye transfer print, printed later
16 x 20 inches

Girl, Alone, Clasping Hands, c.1974 Gelatin silver print; printed c.1974 7 7/84 x 11 5/8 inches

Girl, Alone, Clasping Hands, c.1974
Gelatin silver print; printed c.1974
7 7/84 x 11 5/8 inches

Saddle Shoe, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, April 21, 1973 Gelatin silver print; printed c.1973 7 3/4 x 11 7/8 inches

Saddle Shoe, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, April 21, 1973
Gelatin silver print; printed c.1973
7 3/4 x 11 7/8 inches

Press Release

Mark Cohen was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania where he lived and photographed for most of his life. His work was first exhibited in 1969 at the George Eastman House. Known primarily for his black and white images, he was also a pioneer of the 1970s color movement.

 

Cohen is the quintessential street photographer, using an aggressive approach in which he closes in on strangers with a camera and flash before they’re aware of being photographed. His stark images made on the streets of Wilkes-Barre and other working-class Pennsylvania towns capture moments, gestures, and emotions that, because they might be invisible to others’ sensibilities, testify to Cohen’s innately superior perception, his gift of precise and ingenious visual ordering. His work received early recognition, with a one-person show at the Museum of Modern Art in 1973 when he was just thirty, and it has garnered critical acclaim ever since. Today, Cohen’s work is held in over thirty prominent international collections, ranging from the Metropolitan Museum in New York City to the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography.